C.of E. General Synod Welcomes Trans-Gender People

Welcoming Transgender People

09 July 2017
The General Synod of the Church of England has passed a motion on welcoming transgender people.

Members of Synod, meeting in York, supported a call for the House of Bishops to consider preparing nationally commended liturgical materials to mark a person’s gender transition.

The motion also recognises the “need for transgender people to be welcomed and affirmed in their parish church”.

It was moved by the Revd Christopher Newlands on behalf of the Blackburn Diocesan Synod.

Opening the debate, he said: “I hope that we can make a powerful statement to say that we believe that trans people are cherished and loved by God, who created them, and is present through all the twists and turns of their lives.”

Speaking during the debate the Bishop of Worcester, Dr John Inge said: “Our response needs to be loving and open and welcoming and the passing of this motion would be a very important factor in that.”

An amendment to the motion, moved by Dr Nick Land of the Diocese of York, calling instead for the House of Bishops to consider the theological, pastoral and other issues around gender transition, was rejected by all three houses of Synod.

The votes in the House of Bishops were 30 for and two against, with two abstentions.
In the House of Clergy 127 backed the motion with 28 against and 16 abstentions.
In the House of Laity 127 supported the motion with 48 opposing and eight abstentions.

Notes to Editors

The motion passed reads:

That this S the need for transgender people to be welcomed and affirmed in their parish church, call on the House of Bishops to consider whether some nationally commended liturgical materials might be prepared to mark a person’s gender transition.

A live stream of Synod proceedings, including previous sessions, can be viewed here.9 July 2017
The General Synod of the Church of England has passed a motion on welcoming transgender people.

Members of Synod, meeting in York, supported a call for the House of Bishops to consider preparing nationally commended liturgical materials to mark a person’s gender transition.

The motion also rs the “need for transgender people to be welcomed and affirmed in their parish church”.

It was moved by t on behalf of the Blackburn Diocesan Synod.

Opening the debate, he said: “I hope that we can make a powerful statement to say that we believe that trans people are cherished and loved by God, who created them, and is present through all the twists and turns of their lives.”

Speaking during the debate the Bishop of Worcester, Dr John Inge said: “Our response needs to be loving and open and welcoming and the passing of this motion would be a very important factor in that.”

An amendment to the motion, moved by Dr Nick Land of the Diocese of York, calling instead for the House of Bishops to consider the theological, pastoral and other issues around gender transition, was rejected by all three houses of Synod.

The votes in the House of Bishops were 30 for and two against, with two abstentions.
In the House of Clergy 127 backed the motion with 28 against and 16 abstentions.
In the House of Laity 127 supported the motion with 48 opposing and eight abstentions.

Notes to Editors

The motion passed reads:

That this Synod, recognising the need for transgender people to be welcomed and affirmed in their parish church, call on the House of Bishops to consider whether some nationally commended liturgical materials might be prepared to mark a person’s gender transition.

A live stream of Synod proceedings, including previous sessions, can be viewed here.

______________________________________________________________

Despite the uncertainties of reliability of internet connections on board ship, I have managed to access this article from the Church of England’s official web-site recently – an article which will no doubt cause GAFCON and its satellites around the Anglican world to retire with the smelling salts – at the mother Province’s intention to bring its archaic rules and regulations on matters of gender and sexuality under the scrutiny of the modern world. Moreover, there is the underlying intention of influencing the rest of the world-wide Anglican Communion to follow suit, in outlawing endemic homophobia and sexism from with its ranks.

With GAFCON intent on reliance upon out-dated teaching about human gender and sexuality; their Archbishops will be breathing fire and brimstone upon all Anglicans who believe that the Mother Church is only seeking to redress historic injustice. This is already evidenced by Nigeria’s Archbishop Okoh’s (Chair of GAFCON) statement of severance from such Anglican inclusivism. He and other GAFCON Primates are still in favour of punishing LGBTI people with all the force of law that their host countries – mainly in Africa – are wont to hand out against the existence of such a minority group.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

(presently afloat off Lisbon)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Abp. Okoh (GAFCON) pronounces anathema on C.of E. General Synod

The Church of England is in ‘grave spiritual danger’, warns Archbishop

The Archbishop, Metropolitan and Primate of All Nigeria, Nicholas OkohGafcon

The leader of the Anglican Church in Nigeria has slammed the General Synod of the Church of England for ‘false teaching’ and is warning that it is in ‘grave spiritual danger’.

Archbishop Nicholas Okoh’s attack follows the Synod’s decision to back a proposal for services marking new identities for transgender people.

Writing to the ‘faithful’ of the conservative GAFCON fellowship that he chairs, Okoh says in his latest letter, published on the website the Anglican Church in NIgeria, ‘False teaching is restless and relentless, and the Church of England itself is in grave spiritual danger.’

He says it ‘much to be regretted’ that there has been far more concern about alleged ‘boundary crossing’ than about the ‘contempt of God’s Word’ that made the controversial consecration of missionary bishop Andy Lines necessary.

Archbishop Nicholas Okoh (left of centre), primate of the Church of Nigeria, stands with Bishop Martyn Minns (centre) of the Convocation of Anglicans in North America.Photo: The Christian Post

Condemning also the ‘recent capitulation of the Scottish Episcopal Church to secular ideas about marriage’. he criticises the fact that the Bishop of Edinburgh, who has strongly supported the Scottish Episcopal Church’s move towards endorsing same sex marriage, was invited as a guest of honour the synod which met a few days ago in York.

Advertisement

‘Although the Church of England’s legal position on marriage has not changed, its understanding of sexual morality has,’ he writes. ‘Same sex relationships, which were described by Lambeth Resolution I.10 of 1998 as “incompatible with Scripture” now receive approval at the highest level.

‘For example, Vicky Beeching, a singer, songwriter and activist who advocates homosexual marriage was honoured with the Archbishop Thomas Cranmer award for Worship in a ceremony at Lambeth Palace.’

He says the need for GAFCON to safeguard the integrity and clarity of global Anglican mission is as urgent as it has ever been, he writes. ‘Our calling is not to be conformed, but to be transformed. A watching world needs to know that Anglicans are defined first and foremost by faithfulness to the Word of God.’

Jayne Ozanne, a member of the General Synod who introduced the motion calling for a ban on gay conversion therapy, said: ‘It is with great sadness that I have read Archbishop Okoh’s inflammatory words regarding the thoughtful decisions made by the General Synod, endorsed by both our Archbishops, in relation to the LGBTI community. He does himself no credit in calling those with whom he disagrees “false teachers”, and would do well to reflect on how broad and deep the love of God is for all humankind.

‘GAFCON continues to alienate itself from those open to hearing what the Spirit is saying, and who look to take the whole Bible into account – not just a few chosen verses.’

______________________________________________________________

It was perhaps inevitable that the ‘Primate of All Nigeria’ – Archbishop Okoh – should make a statement on behalf of the ultra-conservative Global South entity ‘GAFCON’; calculated to dismiss the forward-looking determination of the Church of England General Synod, held in York recently, to outlaw institutional homophobia and sexism in that Church.

Okoh- and his fellow protesters at GAFCON – are intent on continuing their support for homophobic and sexist attitudes through the world-wide Anglican Communion. However, as the Mother Province of the Communion, the Church of England is (rightly, in my opinion) resisting the continuance of such death-dealing traditions that have allowed certain countries of the Global South to enact deadly legislation against LGBTI people in their jurisdictions – aided and abetted by the local Anglican Church.

While enjoying our sabbatical in Europe, Diana (my wife) and I are not closely in touch with the goings-on on the likes of Archbishop Okoh and his friends at the GAFCON, but we noticed this press statement which appeared on our internet connection on board ship today, and I could not let it go by without comment.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand (presently in transit aboard ‘Ventura’.)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

York Synod call of U.K. Govt. to ban ‘Conversion Therapy’

During Pride in London, Synod in York calls for ban on conversion therapy

PA

Celebrations: Pride in London took place while the Synod met in York

THE General Synod has called on the Government to ban conversion therapy. The move was backed by the Archbishop of York, Dr Sentamu, who said that a ban on the “theologically unsound” practice would enable him to sleep at night.

Members had initially been asked to endorse a statement signed by professional bodies condemning such therapy as “unethical and harmful and not supported by evidence”, but, after passionate speeches by bishops and several emotional personal testimonies, proved willing to go further.

The private member’s motion was introduced on Saturday by Jayne Ozanne, a lay representative from Oxford diocese who has described how undergoing such therapy resulted in her having two breakdowns (News, 30 June). It asked the Synod to endorse a statement issued this year by professional bodies, including the Royal College of GPs and UK Council for Psychotherapy, which states that conversion therapy “has no place in the modern world. It is unethical and harmful and not supported by evidence.”

Conversion therapy was “a form of abuse”, she said, “from which vulnerable adults need protecting”.

The therapy she had undergone was “done by kind, but mostly professionally unqualified prayer ministry individuals who, too, wanted to see me healed. The prayer would seemingly work for a few months or years. and then I would find myself struggling again – ashamed and guilty that it hadn’t worked.

“I became depressed, wondering why God was choosing not to heal me. And my desperation grew. I turned to look for reasons why healing didn’t come. Many sincere Christians, armed with the warped theology of conversion therapy, implied it must be my fault.

“It led to two breakdowns and two spells in hospital, with my body cracking under the strain. My story is, sadly, not unique.”

She described calls for more scientific evidence of proof of harm as a “smokescreen”. She argued: “It is rare for randomised controlled trials to show evidence of harm, as it would take several years of careful monitoring. In addition, it is highly unlikely that any reputable ethics committee would ever give approval for a trial of a treatment they strongly suspect – due to the many testimonial reports – to be harmful.”

The debate was “actually quite simple: Do we trust our medical health professionals and academics – including many sincere, godly Christians – to know what they are talking about?”

Among those who offered her support was the Bishop of Liverpool, the Rt Revd Paul Bayes.

“The world needs to hear us say that LGBTI-plus orientation and identity is not a crime,” he said, with quiet fervour. “We are called to help one another to conform their lives to Jesus Christ and to live lives of holiness, but we do not need to engage people in healing therapy if they are not sick. If the Church suggests that it is a sickness, then all its statements of welcome and inclusion of the LGBT community are null and void.” He was proud to be associated with Gay Pride in Liverpool, to be held later in the year out of respect for Michael Causer, a gay man who was killed in 2008 in an act of hatred.

In an emotional speech, Ed Cox (Church of England Youth Council) declared an interest as a scientist, and a “queer” person. While the Church wanted all people to be treasured, loved, and valued, this had not happened for the LGBT community.

He had put his sexual identity down to his relationship with his father, a lifestyle choice, a phase, and experimenting, and had been told that he was “made wrong” by God. He had been diagnosed with severe depression because of this, and begged the Synod to pass the motion as it stood, to prevent others’ going through the same ordeal.

Ms Ozanne’s proposals caused concern among some members.

Dr Simon Clift, a consultant in occupational health, argued that, when distress arose as a result of a conflict between beliefs and desires, “surely one legitimate option would be for them to seek the input of appropriately trained therapists who can address these desires in order to diminish them?”

An amendment was moved by the Revd Dr Sean Doherty, a tutor at St Mellitus theological college, and a trustee of Living Out, which seeks “to help Christian brothers and sisters who experience same-sex attraction stay faithful to biblical teaching on sexual ethics and flourish at the same time”. It affirmed that pastoral care, prayer ministry, and professional counselling were “legitimate means of supporting individuals who choose them freely, provided that they respect the property dignity of human beings, and do not involve coercion or manipulation or make unwarranted promises about the removal of unwanted feelings”. It asked the House of Bishops to draw up guidelines “to discourage inappropriate pastoral practices, and to encourage good ones”.

______________________________________________________________

I apologise to readers of ‘Kiwianglo’ for not having posted lately, by virtue of my holiday with my wife, Diana, in Europe. However, today, on board P. & O.’s cruise liner ‘Ventura’. en route from Southampton to Madeira and the Canary Islands; I came across this news item from the Church Times, reporting that the Anglican Church’s York Diocesan Synod has petitioned the U.K. Government to outlaw the process of ‘Conversion Therapy’ for LGBTI people, in the expectation of ‘curing them’ of their natural sexual orientation that is different from the predominant  male-female norm.

It has long been known by those whose sexual orientation is actually, different from the norm, that they have no way of being legitimately ‘converted’ from their natural sexual orientation, and to be expected to be able to conform to the majority sexual disposition could be both a legal and spiritual impropriety equal to a breach of common human rights.

Thank God the York Synod had requested the U.K. Government to outlaw the practices of those in the psycho-psychiatric professions who contend that a person’s natural, God-given, sexual identity can (or even should) be ‘converted’ to comply with the majority.

Jane Ozanne’s compelling testimony to the contrary, should help the majority of people to understand the position of those whose lives have been spoiled by efforts – however well-meaning – to change the sexual orientation of LGBTI people in society.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

(currently “at large” in the Bay of Biscay)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Here’s To All The #NewRevs

Source: Here’s To All The #NewRevs

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Canterbury versus GAFCON Primate

GAFCON Chairman Clashes with Archbishop Welby over Boundary Crossing

GAFCON Chairman Clashes with Archbishop Welby over Boundary Crossing
Athanasius consecrated orthodox bishops…because he knew that the apostolic faith itself was at stake
The creation of a missionary bishop for Europe is an historic moment, says Archbishop Nicholas Okoh

By David W. Virtue, DD
www.virtueonline.org
June 15, 2017

GAFCON chairman and Nigerian Primate, Nicholas Okoh, clashed with Archbishop Justin Welby over the recent passage of a resolution by the Scottish Episcopal Church to redefine marriage to include same-sex couples, resulting in the announcement that GAFCON would ordain a bishop to provide episcopal oversight for bishops and clergy who believed that such actions betray the faith once received.

Welby wrote to the GAFCON Archbishops saying he did not consider the appointment of a “Missionary Bishop” in the person of Andy Lines to be necessary and berated the Primates for “cross-border intervention”, arguing that it was not a Church of England appointment and therefore carried no weight in the Church of England.

“Historically, there has been resistance to cross-border interventions and ordinations from the earliest years of the universal Church’s existence. Such weighty authority as canons 15 and 16 of the first Council of Nicaea in AD 325 are uncompromising in this regard and make reference to the ‘great disturbance and discords that occur’ when bishops and their clergy seek to minister in this way,” wrote Welby.

The Nigerian Primate fired back, saying that what happened in Scotland was similar to the clash between the heretic Arius and Athanasius in the fourth century, which nearly overwhelmed the church by the Arians, but was rescued by Athanasius.

“If the Church had continued to follow Arius, the Christian faith would have been lost. I am reminded of Athanasius because we are facing a similar struggle for the integrity of the gospel in our time. On Thursday, 8th June, the Scottish Episcopal Church (SEC) changed its teaching to allow men to be married to men and women to women. It followed the path already taken by the Episcopal Church of the United States (TEC) and the Anglican Church of Canada.

“This attempt to redefine marriage is not a secondary issue about which we can agree to disagree and continue to walk together. It means that Jesus was mistaken when he taught that marriage was between a man and a woman and that sex outside of such a marriage is a sin. It is a radical rejection of the authority of Scripture. The Church claims that it can consecrate behavior that God’s Word clearly teaches to be sinful. According to the Bible, this behavior, without repentance, separates those who practice it from his kingdom.

“Athanasius consecrated orthodox bishops in dioceses led by Arians because he knew that the apostolic faith itself was at stake. This was the principle guiding the interventions which led to the formation of the Anglican Church in North America in 2009 and it was affirmed by over three hundred bishops in assembly at GAFCON 2013 in Nairobi. It was therefore very appropriate that on the same day that the Scottish Episcopal Church formally turned aside from the historic Christian faith, GAFCON announced that Canon Andy Lines, already an internationally recognized missionary statesman, will be consecrated later this month as a GAFCON missionary bishop for Europe.”

Archbishop Okoh said it was not a step taken lightly, and from the beginning GAFCON has been committed to standing with the marginalized. “Requests for help from Scottish orthodox leaders to the Archbishop of Canterbury were turned down. Indeed, the Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church told his General Synod last year that the Archbishop of Canterbury had assured him that he would welcome the Scottish Church to the 2020 Lambeth Conference even if it chose to change its marriage canon to include same sex unions.”

Archbishop Okoh said GAFCON stands ready to recognize and support orthodox Anglicans in Scotland and elsewhere in Europe as the drift away from apostolic faith and order continues.

“For reasons of mission and conscience, we can expect to find a growing number of orthodox Anglican congregations needing oversight outside traditional structures, as is already the case with the Anglican Mission in England.

“The creation of a missionary bishop for Europe is an historic moment. It is a recognition that the era of European Christendom has passed and that in this 500th anniversary year of the Reformation, a new start is being made by building global partnerships for mission.”

Okoh called on orthodox Anglicans to stand with the marginalized and to work tirelessly for the continuing reformation of our “beloved Communion.”

__________________________________________________

This last paragraph of Mr. David Virtue’s opinion piece on the clash between the Archbishop of Canterbury and the rebellious GAFCON consortium of the Global South Primates, quite clearly  demonstrates the delusion suffered by Virtue and his friends at GAFCON that they, only, represent what they are pleased to call ‘orthodox’ Anglicanism at this point in history.

Completely forgetting the fact that, without Canterbury, there would have been no Anglican Church in the Global South; and the ‘Primate of All Nigeria’, Nicholas Okoh, might never have reached the exalted status of a Church Leader – never mind the leader of a rebellious faction with the worldwide Communion of Anglican Christians that he now presumes to launch into intentional schism- purely on the basis of the outdated GAFCON understanding of human gender and sexuality.

The purists, whose agenda is promoted by ‘virtue-on-line’ and a gaggle of associated offshoots of the Gafcon Primates, who have raised up their own schismatic churches from their Anglican roots around the world, will soon discover that schism begets further schism until all semblance of the ‘mother Church’ they presume to have replaced will disappear from their midst.

What the rebels seem not to clearly understand is that there is no ‘perfect’ Church. Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners – not the so-called ‘righteous’, who may just be left to their own ‘devices and desires of their own hearts’.

Perhaps they need to read again (and again) Jesus’ story about the Pharisee and the Publican in the Temple. One, only, went away justified; and it was NOT the Pharisee! It was the sinner who acknowledged his innate sinful nature and was, thereby, redeemed!

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Irish Bishop see SEC’s move as ‘A Way Forward’

IRELAND: Bishop says Scottish church’s move on gay marriage ‘a way forward’

IRELAND: Bishop says Scottish church’s move on gay marriage ‘a way forward’
Scottish Episcopal Church first major congregation in UK to allow same-sex marriage

Church of Ireland Bishop of Cork Paul Colton: ‘the reality is that there is such diversity and difference throughout the Church of Ireland.’ Photograph: Cyril Byrne

By Patsy McGarry
www.irishtimes.com
June 12, 2017

The Church of Ireland may have found a way forward on the issue of same-sex marriage following a move by a church in Scotand, Bishop of Cork Paul Colton has said.

The Scottish Episcopal Church last week became the first major church in Britain or Ireland to allow same-sex marriage. A vote by its general synod in Edinburgh removed a clause from the church’s canon law which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

However, clergy who do not agree can opt out of conducting same-sex weddings.

Dublin-born Bishop David Chillingworth is primus of the Scottish Church. He was ordained in Belfast and served in Northern Ireland until 2005 when he was consecrated Bishop of the diocese of St Andrews, Dunkeld and Dunblane in Scotland.

Addressing the Cork diocesan synod in Douglas, Bishop Colton quoted Bishop Chillingworth who said “the new canon itself affirms that there are differing views of marriage in our church.

“Nobody will be compelled to do anything against their conscience. We affirm that we are a church of diversity and difference, bound together by our oneness in Christ…”

Diversity and difference

Bishop Colton said “the reality is that there is such diversity and difference throughout the Church of Ireland too. Those differences and that diversity cannot be ignored.”

He added it may well be the Scottish approach “represents a way forward for us too that recognises all integrities. It is worth considering in our debate here in Ireland”.

The bishop said “that such things are open to debate in this Church [of Ireland] has always been the case. If there had been no questioning or discourse, the Reformation itself would not have happened, nor would many other developments have unfolded over the centuries, in ministry, in liturgy and in belief, the most recent examples being our change in approach to suicide, to the marriage in church of divorcees, and also the ordination of women, and there are many others.”

Thanksgiving service

Last month a motion that Church of Ireland bishops investigate developing a public thanksgiving service for legally married same-sex couples was defeated at the church’s General Synod in Limerick. It followed debate where speakers divided along North-South lines, with all speakers from the South in favour and all but one Northern speaker opposed.

Meanwhile, a report to the Church of Scotland (Presbyterian) General Assembly last month concluded there were not “sufficient theological grounds to deny nominated individual ministers and deacons the authority to preside at same-sex marriages”.

It said “conscientious refusal” of ministers and deacons to preside at such marriages should be protected and spoke of “constrained difference” in the church over the issue. Officials were instructed to consider changes to church law that would allow ministers to preside over same-sex marriage ceremonies.

A report presented last week in Belfast to the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland concluded that its sister Church of Scotland “has departed from the clear teaching of scripture on the matter of same-sex relationships.”

END

___________________________________________

“Addressing the Cork diocesan synod in Douglas, Bishop Colton quoted Bishop Chillingworth who said “the new canon itself affirms that there are differing views of marriage in our church.

“Nobody will be compelled to do anything against their conscience. We affirm that we are a church of diversity and difference, bound together by our oneness in Christ…”

The C. of I. Bishop of Cork, in quoting S.E.C.’s Presiding Bishop on the fact of  Anglican ‘diversity and difference’, sets the scene for the possible acceptance by the Church of Ireland of a similar process for the acceptance of Equal Marriage to that which now exists in the Episcopal Church of Scotland.

This ought to provoke members of the General Synod of the Church of England to consider carefully their response to the action of fellow Anglican Churches within the British Isles, in making provision for those if its adherents who wish to take advantage of the more liberal attitude towards LGBTI people being advanced by other Anglicans.

Father, Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

(presently in the U.K.)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Feast of Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi

Jesus told his friends to do this, and they have done it always since. Was ever another command so obeyed? For century after century, spreading slowly to every continent and country and among every race on earth, this action has been done, in every conceivable human circumstance, for every conceivable human need from infancy and before it to extreme old age and after it, from the pinnacles of earthly greatness to the refuge of fugitives in the caves and dens of the earth. No better thing has been found than this to do for kings at their crowning and for criminals going to the scaffold; for armies in triumph or for a bride and bridegroom in a little country church; for the wisdom of a Parliament or for a sick old woman afraid to die; for a schoolboy sitting an examination or for Columbus setting out to discover America; for the famine of whole provinces or for the soul of a dead lover; in thankfulness because a father did not die of pneumonia; for a village headman much tempted to return to fetish because the yams had failed; because the Turk was at the gates of Vienna; for the repentance of Margaret; for the settlement of a strike; for the son of a barren woman; for Captain so-and-so, wounded and prisoner of war; while the lions roared in the nearby amphitheatre; on the beach at Dunkirk; while the hiss of scythes in the thick June grass came faintly through the windows of the church; tremulously, by an old monk on the fiftieth anniversary of his vows; furtively, by an exiled bishop who had hewn timber all day in a prison camp near Murmansk; gorgeously, for the canonisation of St Joan of Arc- one could fill many pages with the reasons why this has been done, and not tell a hundredth part of them. And best of all, week by week and month by month, on a hundred thousand successive Sundays, faithfully, unfailingly, across all the parishes of Christendom, the priests have done this just to make the ‘plebs sancta dei’ – the holy common people of God.

Dom Gregory Dix

___________________________________________

This wonderful summation of the vocation of the Church – to celebrate and participate in the Eucharist – written long ago by Anglican monk and liturgist Dom. Gregory Dix – has never lost its basic significance.

Jesus said  “Do this to re-member me” and the Church catholic has continued the process of re-membering the Body of Christ ever since Jesus (by the power of the Holy Spirit) instituted the Eucharist as the Sacrament of God’s Self, primarily in this re-presentation of the sacrifice of Christ.

“He who eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life”, promised Jesus, “and I will raise them up on the Last Day”.  In the meantime, the same offering is to be made on a daily basis by those loyal to Christ, in order for the Church to not only survive but grow into maturity. 

The ‘Bread of Angels’ has been given to humankind, in order to restore us into the Image and Likeness of God that was God’s intention for each one of God’s human children. “O Holy Jesus; most merciful Redeemer, friend and brother; may we know you more clearly, love you more dearly, and follow you more nearly, day by day”. Amen.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

(temporarily in England)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment