Sexuality, Celibacy & Bishops

Sexuality, Celibacy and Bishops

by Kelvin

Chief Inspector of Sodomy

This weekend one of the bishops of the Church of England was outed. He was approached by a journalist who appears to have been in conversation with a great many people last week in the Church of England. The journalist apparently approached the Bishop of Grantham and asked him whether or not he was gay. The consequence of this was that the bishop chose to give an interview to another journalist and a story subsequently appeared in the Guardian.

I don’t wish to comment on the Bishop of Grantham’s situation other than assert that I don’t think that he was a good candidate to be outed and then to wish him well. It seems to me that enough people have had enough to say about him that we must leave him be.

As I have written before, there are some circumstances in which it is appropriate for someone to be outed. Indeed writing from Scotland after the Cardinal O’Brien affair, I think I’d say that there are circumstances in which to out someone who is engaged in the active oppression of other gay people is in itself a moral and commendable act. However, all outing situations have consequences, some of them unexpected.

I don’t happen to know the Bishop of Grantham and just about all that I know about his ministry is a report from someone who told me that he had been heard to preach in favour of the introduction of same-sex marriage. Now, one ethical matter does not one make a saint, but that’s enough for me to think that he was one of the good guys and might have been better left to work for justice and come out at a time of his own choosing.

There are a couple of things that do need to be commented on a little further though that are not immediately about the Bishop of Grantham himself.

Firstly, to note that we seem to be no further forward in getting either a common or a common-sense understanding of what celibacy is. The indignity of people being forced to declare what happens in their bedrooms is hideous. Moreover, the idea of someone being in a “celibate relationship” is entirely absurd.

I’ve written about celibacy at some length before in a blog post which enraged a good many people. (Beware of the Celibate)

I have not fundamentally changed my mind since then. It seems to me that celibacy in the Christian tradition is a turning away from romantic relationships in order to be able turn towards God and turn outwards to others. The idea of an exclusive partnership which is in some way celibate is bordering on being a contradiction of terms. What is really being discussed in England is whether individual bishops (and others) are choosing to abstain from certain sexual practices. There is an enormous difference between celibacy and abstinence and the confusion in the Church of England doesn’t just make Anglicanism look foolish but discredits Christianity as a whole, makes a laughing stock of the wider Anglican Communion and makes it much harder to share the love of God to those who need most to know about it.

I an indebted to my colleague in Edinburgh, Stephen Holmes for drawing to my attention that the idea of a “celibate relationship” is not in fact something that is entirely new within the sphere of Christianity and that something similar was condemned at the Council of Nicea and amongst many of the early theologians of our faith. The third canon of the Council of Nicea explicitly condemns the idea of clergy living in merely spiritual marriages. Basically, male clergy could only have close female relatives living with them. No chance then of having a bidey-in but telling the newspapers that it doesn’t matter because nothing is going on in the bedroom.

Since the outing incident of last weekend, there has been considerable comment about the fact that the bishop has done nothing wrong because he has been celibate. Now, leaving aside that I don’t accept that he’s making a claim of abstinence rather than celibacy, it is worth seeing where all that leads us.

The first trouble is the Anglican Communion whose Secretary General this afternoon wrote an extraordinary note assuring others than he had been assured himself of the lack of hanky-panky in the Bishop of Grantham’s life and so all is well in the Communion. There are two dangers here. One is the danger that he will have to give a report on the sex life of every bishop in the Communion. (Something I can promise you I personally don’t want to hear about). The other is that the Secretary General finds himself unable to distinguish between the mores and norms of the Church of England and those of the Communion itself. He is dangerously close to this in his statement today, and perhaps needs to be reminded that a far greater sin than homosexuality is the inability in his office of being able to distinguish between the Church of England in particular and Anglicanism in general. There are, to put it bluntly once again, churches within the Communion which don’t accept the moral teachings of Lambeth 1.10, never accepted the moral teachings of Lambeth 1.10 and never will accept the teachings of Lambeth 1.10. For the Secretary General to persist in the fantasy that the Communion is united in believing in Lambeth 1.10 is the equivalent of believing that there are faeries (albeit perhaps celibate faeries) living at the bottom of the garden of Lambeth Palace.

The second trouble this weekend is what happens to the Archbishop of Canterbury when such a story as this comes along. The blunt reality is that there needs to be more to the role of being Archbishop of Canterbury than to be the Chief Inspector of Sodomy. I can’t believe that Justin Welby wants to exercise that function either in his own church or any other church but if he wants to avoid being thust into that role, he is going to need to do better than simply parrot the idea that just because someone claims their life is lived under the banner of celibacy that all is somehow well.

The banner that we are supposed to live under is love. And we are not yet seeing the Archbishop call us to a place where we can all affirm that as the birthright of all of God’s children.

If he is to do so, he needs to find ways of resisting being the Chief Inspector of Sodomy whenever Gafcon, the Church of England Press Office or any other conservative campaigning group try to nudge him towards that role. If he does resist it, he will find a world waiting to applaud him. When he doesn’t manage to do so he doesn’t just make a fool of himself but of the rest of us too. And I think people are wearying of that.

Justin Welby is a better man than these statements make him appear.

England will not be won for Christ whilst the structures of the Church of England make Christianity look like a religion for narrow-minded fools.

I happen to think that the next thing that we should expect to hear from the Bishop of Grantham on the matter of homosexuality is whether or not he agrees with the document “Issues in Human Sexuality” – the absurd pseudo-doctrinal statement that the Church of England has somehow committed itself to.

He should be expected to answer that question and do so clearly and unambiguously, but not, however, before every last one of the other bishops has had a chance to answer the same question in public.

I hope that comes soon. Very soon.

However, until it does, I think the Bishop of Grantham deserves a bit of peace.

Kelvin | September 6, 2016 at 9:37 pm | Tags: bishop of Grantham | Categories: Uncategorized | URL:http://wp.me/p5KaY-3Wq
________________________________________________________________
          Father Kelvin Holdsworth, Provost of St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral in Glasgow, gives us some pithy comments about the problems arising in the world-wide Anglican Communion after the  ‘Outing’ of the Church of England’s Bishop of Grantham   in recent newspaper articles
          This event has generated responses from all over the Anglican world – not least from the local representatives of GAFCON in England, who have taken great trouble to point out how disastrous this is for ecumenical relationships and for the Church of England herself.
          A lot of the conversation focuses on conservative views which questions the validity of the bishop’s statement that he is living a celibate life with his partner; with some even suggesting that even living together in a same-sex relationship is tantamount to welcoming temptation to sin and therefore problematic!
          Further on the issue of celibacy within marriage; no-one seems to have questioned the fact that heterosexual use of contraception within marriage is, for some people, sinful; for the ostensible reason that it is not open to procreation. I have argued with people on our local web-site – Anglican Down Under – on this issue, maintaining that intentional contraception is little different from homosexual sexual activity which, in itself – like contraception – is not open to procreation (which, apparently, is the REAL Sin).
          One can only hope that the presence of an openly-Gay-partnered Bishop at the special meetings to deal with the outcome of the celebrated “Conversions on Human Sexuality” in the Church of England, might encourage other Bishops to reveal their hidden sexuality; to the Commission that will decide on the future of Gay clergy and laity in the Church of England.
          Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, new Zealand
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About kiwianglo

Retired Anglican priest, living in Christchurch, New Zealand. Ardent supporter of LGBT Community, and blogger on 'Thinking Anglicans UK' site. Theology: liberal, Anglo-Catholic & traditional. regarding each person as a unique expression of Christ, and therefore lovable.
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