Religion in Schools can help combat Fundamentalism

Education about religion in schools ‘can help combat fundamentalism’

By staff writers – Ekklesia – 20 Jan 2015

The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland believes that non-proselytising religious education in the school curriculum can help promote cooperation in place of fundamentalism

The Rt Rev John Chalmers says that a rounded education in the substance and practise of religion is critical if the rise in religious fundamentalism around the world is to be challenged and defeated.

In his New Year message, Mr Chalmers said that any attempt to remove religious education from Scottish schools should be resisted.

Others have argued that it needs to move out of primarily church hands and become ‘beliefs and values’ style education fit for an increasingly mixed-belief society.

In his statement from December 2014, An Educational Curriculum fit for these days of Religious Intolerance, written before the Paris killings and the latest news about Boko Haram, Mr Chalmers declared: “As we enter a new year there is probably no issue of any greater concern around the world than the rise of religious fundamentalism. Nothing is more dangerous than the radicalised mind and there is nothing worse than the indoctrinated child. We will not, however, defeat such extremism simply by confronting it across battle lines. The frontline for winning this battle is education and the school is the place where young minds need to be introduced to the power of critical enquiry. How else will a young person ever grow to be able to make wise choices unless they are allowed access to the widest possible range of knowledge and how else will they learn tolerance unless they are introduced to the wide ranging menu of different ideas that populate the world.

“Peace in our time will only come when we find the means to respect those with whom we disagree and when we have matured to the point that we can discuss our deepest held views on religion, philosophy and politics without seeking to impose ours on others. Such tolerance, however, will not come by removing, as some desire, religious observance from the school curriculum; on the contrary what we should be doing is building on the strong tradition of religious reflection which is currently a part of the Scottish school environment.

“The Scottish education system is amongst the best in the world. It produces free thinking, independent and creative minds and it does so by opening up the world ideas as they are practised across the world and across every major discipline. One of the most important of these disciplines is that of properly understanding the faiths that motivate most of the world’s population. I am not advocating any measure of proselytising within our schools, but I am saying that knowledge of the substance and practise of religion must be part of any rounded education. Intolerance would, in my view, be the resultant outcome of turning Time for Reflection in schools into a choice.

“There is a theory prevalent in western society that secularism is an unstoppable bandwagon. Sociologists in the 1960s were sure that secularism and modernity went hand in hand and it was only a matter of time before religious views of the world would be passé. It is clear, however, that such theories have been proved wrong. Peter Berger, of Boston University reassessing the place of religion in society writes, “I think that what I and most other sociologists of religion wrote in the 1960s about secularisation was a mistake. Our underlying argument was that secularisation and modernity go hand in hand. It wasn’t a crazy theory. There was some evidence for it. But I think it’s basically wrong. Most of the world is certainly not secular. Religion continues to be important to people in many countries. The one exception is Western Europe. One of the most interesting questions in the sociology of religion today is not ‘How do you explain fundamentalism in Iran? but, ‘Why is Western Europe different?'”

the notion that education about religion and belief in schools can be a help in combatting fundamentalism is widely shared, but there are strong differences about how it should be taught and by whom.

Humanists are pressing for non-religious beliefs to be taught fully and adequately, and along with non-conformist Christians and others would like to see an end to compulsory worship and a fully plural Time for Reflection’ alongside fair and balanced beliefs education.

______________________________________________________________

Now, more than ever in a time of religious fundamentalist conflict around the world, our schools may need to present a programme of comparative religion alongside – in Christian schools – the elements of the Christian Faith. The more pacific elements of religious belief need to be emphasized, in an effort to stem the rise of violence against other belief systems that are different from our own.:

“Peace in our time will only come when we find the means to respect those with whom we disagree and when we have matured to the point that we can discuss our deepest held views on religion, philosophy and politics without seeking to impose ours on others. Such tolerance, however, will not come by removing, as some desire, religious observance from the school curriculum; on the contrary what we should be doing is building on the strong tradition of religious reflection which is currently a part of the Scottish school environment.” – Scottish Presbyterian statement

This statement, from the Moderator of the (Presbyterian) Church of Scotland, highlights the need for a broader religious education – to include an appreciation of the influence of religions other than Christianity –  could well be a means of removing basic ignorance of other faith communities, helping children to gain a broader common understanding of the benefits of religious faith as a means to forging peaceful co-existence.

Fundamentalist religion  – in any form – can be an enemy of faith in the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ  “Who loved the world so much, He sent His Only-Begotten Son into the world…….” – not for the purpose of sectarian triumphalism, but for the purpose of peace and reconciliation of all the world to God’s-self. The fact that Jesus was able to recognise the basic good in people outside of his own Jewish faith community, should be understood, in order that we might all learn the intrinsic value of all human beings – even those with whom we might disagree on the basic of their religious affiliation.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

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About kiwianglo

Retired Anglican priest, living in Christchurch, New Zealand. Ardent supporter of LGBT Community, and blogger on 'Thinking Anglicans UK' site. Theology: liberal, Anglo-Catholic & traditional. regarding each person as a unique expression of Christ, and therefore lovable.
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One Response to Religion in Schools can help combat Fundamentalism

  1. murraysmallbone says:

    The Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland speaks wisdom.
    The education of children is a precious responsibility.
    The most important part of which ought to be the formation of character especially conscience and moral rectitude.In the past in a religious setting this too often has been aligned along the “code(s)” of the particular religious ethos.
    Such codes have been taught as prohibitions and judgement calling.Such perversions of religion do not open up the child to the “self” but rather create a non-human robot who is incapable of responding to the goals of the best aspirations of religion.
    The material stuff of education -“knowledge” are like the pages of a book; useless if the spine of the book has not been made properly.If the spine of the book is made up solely of prohibitive religion, then the child will be cast adrift in a world where fundamentalism does not equip the child to play his /her role where the role of the “other(s)” does matter , if we are to share a common humanity.
    As the alumnus of an Australian Anglo-Catholic boarding school , I remain ever grateful for a school whose ethos constantly taught; enquire and speak your mind.!!

    Jesu mercy! Mary pray!

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