Weapons into Ploughshares – Bp. Dinis Sengulane

Anglican Communion’s long-serving bishop retires – Posted on: March 25, 2014

The Rt. Rev. Dinis Sengulane

Anglican Communion’s long-serving bishop retires

Posted on: March 25, 2014 4:44 PM

The Rt. Rev. Dinis Sengulane
Photo Credit: ENS
Related Categories: Bp SengulaneMozambiqueSouthern Africa

[ENS by Matthew Davies] The Rt. Rev. Dinis Sengulane, the longest-serving bishop in the Anglican Communion, retired March 25 after leading the Diocese of Lebombo in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa for almost 38 years.

Consecrated as bishop in 1976, Sengulane made his mark as one of Africa’s greatest peacemakers when his efforts to mediate between the Mozambique government and the rebel group Renamo brought an end to 15 years of civil war in 1992.

His much-acclaimed Swords Into Ploughshares initiative exchanged thousands of weapons for tools of construction.

About 1 million weapons have been decommissioned since the end of the war. Many have been converted into art, a project that continues today with works exhibited throughout Mozambique and all over the world.

As he enters retirement, Sengulane reflects on his ministry of peacemaking. Yet he doesn’t see this as his story.

Photo Credit: ENS  – [ENS by Matthew Davies]
The Rt. Rev. Dinis Sengulane, the longest-serving bishop in the Anglican Communion, retired March 25 after leading the Diocese of Lebombo in the Anglican Church of Southern Africa for almost 38 years.

Consecrated as bishop in 1976, Sengulane made his mark as one of Africa’s greatest peacemakers when his efforts to mediate between the Mozambique government and the rebel group Renamo brought an end to 15 years of civil war in 1992.

His much-acclaimed Swords Into Ploughshares initiative exchanged thousands of weapons for tools of construction.

About 1 million weapons have been decommissioned since the end of the war. Many have been converted into art, a project that continues today with works exhibited throughout Mozambique and all over the world.

As he enters retirement, Sengulane reflects on his ministry of peacemaking. Yet he doesn’t see this as his story.

______________________________________________________________

Episcopal News Service gives us this very impressive video interview, marking the retirement of one of the Anglican Communion’s longest-serving Bishops, +Dinis Sengulane, Bishop of the Diocese of Lebombo in Southern Africa.

This is a moving testimonial to the peace-making skills of a humble Anglican Bishop, whose initiative during the civil war brought the whole Christian community in his country together, to find a way of ending the 15-year stand-off between the Mozambique Government and the rebel group Renamo.

It was Bishop Dinis who suggested that the advice of the Prophet Micah in the Bible – that swords could be turned into ploughshares – would help in the situation that threatened the stability of his country. This became a policy that – with the active mediation of Christians – was taken up by both sides, ending in a peaceful settlement between the rival forces in that country.

From Bishop Dinis’ testimony here, it can be seen how the prayerful intervention of a truly committed Christian can work wonders – even in our world of today. The Church in Southern Africa will surely miss the active ministry of yet another Peacemaker, equal in importance to that of former South African Archbishop, Desmond Tutu.

May God bless them both.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

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About kiwianglo

Retired Anglican priest, living in Christchurch, New Zealand. Ardent supporter of LGBT Community, and blogger on 'Thinking Anglicans UK' site. Theology: liberal, Anglo-Catholic & traditional. regarding each person as a unique expression of Christ, and therefore lovable.
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