Prince Charles warns about Religious Fundamentalism

Christianity beginning ‘to disappear’ in its birthplace, warns Prince of Wales

Prince of Wales delivers impassioned personal plea for Christians in the Middle East, warning ‘organised persecution’ by Islamist fundamentalists could sever 2,000-year link

By , Religious Affairs Editor

10:00PM GMT 17 Dec 2013

Christianity is beginning “to disappear” in its own birthplace after 2,000 years because of a wave of “organised persecution” across the Middle East, the Prince of Wales has warned.

In an impassioned intervention, he said that the world is in danger of losing something “irreplaceably precious” with communities tracing their history back to the time of Jesus now under threat from fundamentalist Islamist militants.

Speaking openly of his own Christian faith, he said he had become “deeply troubled” by the plight of those he described as his “brothers and sisters in Christ”.

Prince Charles accompanied by Prince Ghazi bin Mohammad of Jordan (2nd right) during the visit, celebrating Christian communities from the Middle-East in Britain. Photo: AFP/Getty Images

And the Prince, a long-standing advocate of dialogue between religions, voiced personal dismay at seeing his work over the last 20 years to “build bridges and dispel ignorance” being deliberately destroyed by those attempting to exploit the Arab Spring for their own ends.

He devoted a Christmas reception for religious leaders at Clarence House to draw attention to the threat Christians have come under in recent months across Egypt, Syria, Iraq and other parts of the region.

In a calculated display of unity, he delivered his comments flanked by Prince Ghazi of Jordan and joined by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev Justin Welby, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Westminster, the Most Rev Vincent Nichols and the Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis.

It came at the end of a day in which he heard vivid personal testimony from Middle Eastern Christians who have fled to the UK as he visited the London cathedral of the Syriac Orthodox Church and the Coptic Orthodox Church centre in Stevenage, Herts.

Clerics spoke of a new era of “martyrs” as one Syrian man clasped his hands together pleading with the Prince for help. Another showed him mobile phone pictures of the destruction in his own village.

In his address the Prince urged Christians, Muslims and Jews to unite in “outrage” as he warned that the elimination of Christianity in much of the region in which it developed would be a “major blow to peace”.

“I have for some time now been deeply troubled by the growing difficulties faced by Christian communities in various parts of the Middle East,” he said.

“It seems to me that we cannot ignore the fact that Christians in the Middle East are increasingly being deliberately targeted by fundamentalist Islamist militants.”

In a reference to the Christmas story, he added: “Christianity was literally born in the Middle East and we must not forget our Middle Eastern brothers and sisters in Christ.

“Their church communities link us straight back to the early church as I was reminded by hearing Aramaic, our Lord’s own language spoken and sung just a few hours ago.

“Yet today the Middle East and North Africa has the lowest concentration of Christians in the world – just four per cent of the population and it is clear that the Christian population has dropped dramatically over the last century and is falling still further.

“This has an effect on all of us, although of course primarily on those Christians who can no longer continue to live in the Middle East.

“We all lose something immensely and irreplaceably precious when such a rich tradition dating back 2,000 years begins to disappear.”

Speaking personally, he added: “For 20 years I have tried to build bridges between Islam and Christianity and to dispel ignorance and misunderstanding.

“The point though surely is that we have now reached a crisis where the bridges are rapidly being deliberately destroyed by those with a vested interest in doing so.

“This is achieved through intimidation, false accusation and organised persecution including upon Christian communities in the Middle East at the present time.”

Prince Ghazi emphasised the importance of Christianity to the Arab world.

“Christians were present in the Arab world 600 years before Muslims,” he said.

“Indeed, Arabs were perhaps the first non-Hebrew Christians in the world, and became Christians during Jesus Christ’s own lifetime.”

_______________________________________________________________

Despite initial  criticism from conservative Christians in the U.K., Prince Charles has long been a ‘Defender of Faith’ in England. His early reference to the fact that, rather than just being the traditional ‘Defender of The Faith’ of Christians, he felt his role as Monarch would entail his defence of faith for everyone with belief in the God of Creation.

His recent plea for the defence of Christians in the Middle-East, which has lately come under threat from militant Islamists, is not so much a defence of one religious community against the beliefs of another; rather, it is a further demonstration of his stand against religious fundamentalism, that can be a threat to those of a different religious tradition – from whatever source that fundamentalism arises.

Recent events throughout the world have given rise to religious fundamentalism from many different ethnic and spiritual entities – including, for example, the different faces of Islamic belief, where Sunnis and Shi’ite communities are taking up arms against each other. In some countries, Hindu and Muslim communities are violently disposed towards one another; whereas in some countries – such as the former Yugoslavia – there are even Christian communities divided by ethnic loyalties.

What Prince Charles is pointing to in the present conflicts in the Middle East, is the problem of disappearing Christian communities in places where Christianity was first practised, places where extreme Islamic fanatics are waging war against Christians by destroying their churches and persecuting adherents. This is not coming from the rank and file of Muslim believers, but from a lunatic fringe, taking advantage of international unrest in places where Christians are in the minority.

It is well-known that Prince Charles has long supported inter-faith dialogue and various community schemes which foster good relationships between the different religious groups and communities now living in Britain. His current support for a more wide-ranging international forum for religious interaction and ongoing dialogue, can only be seen as a laudable initiative on the part of people of Britain and their future Monarch to outlaw problems of religious intolerance – not only on their  own doorstep, but also more widely, especially in the regions most affected by intolerance of other people’s faith traditions.

Father Ron Smith, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Advertisements

About kiwianglo

Retired Anglican priest, living in Christchurch, New Zealand. Ardent supporter of LGBT Community, and blogger on 'Thinking Anglicans UK' site. Theology: liberal, Anglo-Catholic & traditional. regarding each person as a unique expression of Christ, and therefore lovable.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Prince Charles warns about Religious Fundamentalism

  1. Well done to Prince Charles for highlighting this crucial matter.Though personally not a Royalist we are fortunate to have the next Head of State who is unashamedely Christian and fortunately one not of narrow views.
    It behoves all Christians to pray for those living under conditions where red martyrdom is a living reality.Prayers to Mary Undoer of Knots would be ideal.
    Jesu mercy. Mary pray

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s